Just Another Pale Person...

...Looking at the universe

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oceanographic:

underwater majesty (by SirEstragon)
woodendreams:

(by Cinematic Photography)
astronomicalwonders:

Star Formation within the Eagle Nebula - M16
This star-forming region is famous for its space pillars that appear in this infrared view from NASA’s Spitzer space telescope. The green dust is the cooler dust and the red dust represents hotter dust that was warmed by the explosion of a massive star 8,000 to 9,000 years ago. Astronomers estimate that the explosions blast wave spread outward and destroyed the eagle nebula’s three famous pillars about 6,000 years about. Since the light from the nebula takes about 7,000 years to reach us we will not witness this destruction for about another 1,000 years.
Credit: NASA/Spitzer
tales-of-a-beautiful-tragedy:

🌀 on We Heart It - http://weheartit.com/entry/113098274

Halo 3 Concept Art: The Control Room of Installation 04B

(Source: maschinen-mensch, via firaja)

themineralogist:

Erythrite (by Ihagee86)
themineralogist:

Erythrite (by Ihagee86)
space-wallpapers:

The Milky Way Over Bio-luminescent Plankton

astronomicalwonders:

Filaments on the Inner Ring of the Helix Nebula

This cropped version of the Helix Nebula (also known as NGC 7293) mosaic shows cometary-filaments embedded along a portion of the inner rim of the nebula’s red and blue gas ring. The Nebula is in the constellation Aquarius at a distance of 650 light-years from Earth. The Helix is one of the nearest planetary nebulae to Earth and it a frequency target of study. Because of its ere stare it is sometimes called the “Eye of God”.

Credit: NASA/ESO/Hubble/Helix Imaging Team

(via galaxyclusters)

trynottodrown:

                   Green Turtle | Tomas Kotouc

gurib:

Mushrooms  / fungi after the rains

(via mycology)

flips99:

Tiny fungus

(via mycology)

sketchbookadventure:

so many beautiful mushrooms..

x x x x x x

(via mycology)

spaceplasma:

M51: Chandra Captures Galaxy Sparkling in X-rays

Nearly a million seconds of observing time with NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed a spiral galaxy similar to the Milky Way glittering with hundreds of X-ray points of light.
The galaxy is officially named Messier 51 (M51) or NGC 5194, but often goes by its nickname of the “Whirlpool Galaxy.” Like the Milky Way, the Whirlpool is a spiral galaxy with spectacular arms of stars and dust. M51 is located about 30 million light years from Earth, and its face-on orientation to Earth gives us a perspective that we can never get of our own spiral galactic home.
By using Chandra, astronomers can peer into the Whirlpool to uncover things that can only be detected in X-rays. In this new composite image, Chandra data are shown in purple. Optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope are red, green, and blue.
Most of the X-ray sources are X-ray binaries (XRBs). These systems consist of pairs of objects where a compact star, either a neutron star or, more rarely, a black hole, is capturing material from an orbiting companion star. The infalling material is accelerated by the intense gravitational field of the compact star and heated to millions of degrees, producing a luminous X-ray source. The Chandra observations reveal that at least ten of the XRBs in M51 are bright enough to contain black holes. In eight of these systems the black holes are likely capturing material from companion stars that are much more massive than the Sun.

Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Wesleyan Univ./R.Kilgard, et al; Optical: NASA/STScI